Open + Connected

Sessions and Schedule

iCal

Sunday, October 4

11:00
AM -
6:00
PM
Registration (4th Floor Registration Area)
20091004T11000020091004T180000
12:00
1:00
PM
Workshop Presenters and Attendee Lunch (Regency Ballroom)
20091004T12000020091004T130000
1:00
4:30
PM
Workshops
Advanced CSS Workshop
Advanced CSS Workshop (WRK1) A hands-on opportunity to play with some advanced CSS concepts. Bring your laptops and an open mind. We'll cover many of the current hot design techniques: multi-column layout, faux-column layout, advanced image replacement techniques, advanced list manipulation, rounded corner boxes, son-of-suckerfish dropdowns, cross-column pull-outs, CSS hacks, and customized CSS for alternate devices. Wright B Workshops 20091004T130000 20091004T163000 Daniel Frommelt (University of Wisconsin - Platteville)
Client-side Interactivity Through Javascript - jQuery and AJAX
Client-side Interactivity Through Javascript - jQuery and AJAX (WRK2) Today's website consumers demand a tremendous amount of flexibility, responsiveness and interactivity from the websites they visit. People have become used to Web applications like Facebook, GMail and Twitter which make heavy use of Web browser client-side programming in Javascript and interaction with Web services using the AJAX programming model. This workshop will teach you the basics of Web browser client-side programming using Web standards. We'll take a quick tour of HTTP, DOM, Javascript, XML and JSON, then jump in with hands-on exercises using the jQuery Javascript library, building up an interactive website utilizing AJAX Web services. You should come prepared with a laptop, your favorite text editor and the latest version of the Firefox Web browser. Before the conference we'll also provide a list of Firefox extensions you'll need to install. A familiarity with Javascript, DOM, XHTML, CSS and some client-side programming is necessary for this session. Walker Workshops 20091004T130000 20091004T163000 Jason Woodward (Cornell University)
Developing and Maintaining Web Content: An Idea Generating Workshop
Developing and Maintaining Web Content: An Idea Generating Workshop (WRK3) This popular HighEdWeb workshop is a great way to start off the conference! Using some of the cornerstone topics in communications and public relations, this workshop examines the development of good Web content. The second half of the workshop looks at research techniques available for developing and assessing websites. MacArthur Workshops 20091004T130000 20091004T163000 Douglas Tschopp (Augustana College)
From YouTube to SHU Tube
From YouTube to SHU Tube (WRK4) Learn how Seton Hall University (SHU) engaged consumers, students, faculty, and alumni to share and interact with its website via SHU Tube—a deceptively simple Web application that taps into the YouTube network enabling consumers to post videos online and become the greatest brand advocates of all. You'll hear a firsthand account of Seton Hall's journey to make its website as interactive as possible (with little to no cost) by leveraging its Web content management solution. SHU Tube videos proved five times more effective than other types of advertising, and Seton Hall improved its conversion rates by re-using video content throughout its site and sharing video content via any delivery channel (Web, smart phone, PDA, Facebook, etc.) Learn how SHU Tube helped build trusting and lasting relationships by providing true transparency to its organization, and a more authentic Web experience. Mitchell Workshops 20091004T130000 20091004T163000 Rob Brosnan (Seton Hall University), Ron West (PaperThin)
Google Analytics for Higher Ed
Google Analytics for Higher Ed (WRK5) Google Analytics is a powerful, enterprise-ready Web analytics tool that provides actionable, data-supported insights into website performance. This tool, when leveraged correctly, can provide quantitative information pertaining to the success (or failure) of content, marketing campaigns, goal conversions, and site effectiveness. Because of its robust feature set and affordable price, Google Analytics has become one of the most widely used analytical applications in higher education. In turn -- as many institutions are experiencing shrinking budgets -- recruitment and retention activities are embracing advanced online strategies. In order to justify these strategies and to examine their success, a powerful and customizable Web analytics strategy must be adopted to calculate returns on investment. Such strategies can be created and thoroughly evaluated with Google Analytics. During this workshop, we will explore in great depth the terminology and features of Google Analytics that every Web manger, marketer, designer, and developer needs to understand in order to accurately gauge the effectiveness of his or her institution or department's website. Wright A Workshops 20091004T130000 20091004T163000 Seth Meranda (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Intro to Flash
Intro to Flash (WRK6) This workshop will cover the basics of developing Flash animation for the Web. We will be using Adobe Flash CS3 Professional to do some hands-on exercises that will show the student how to create animations, simple interactivity, and a video game. We will also cover such topics as Flash CS3's built-in accessibility features, managing symbols and instance, working with video, and publishing your flash movie. Attendants must bring a laptop with Adobe Flash CS3 Professional installed. Wright C Workshops 20091004T130000 20091004T163000 Shelly Brown (Southwest Baptist University)
Negotiation for the Web Professional
Negotiation for the Web Professional (WRK7) Negotiation is a basic skill. We do it every day, whether we think about it or not. Studying negotiation yields a toolbox of techniques one can draw upon to navigate everyday human interactions. As professionals, the goal is to get along, find agreement, and get what we need to get our jobs done. After all, command-and-control is for the business sector, and when are we Web people ever in charge? Returning again this year, this workshop is designed to cover some of the basic tools every negotiator should have, with several in-class scenarios to illustrate key points. Pabst Workshops 20091004T130000 20091004T163000 Steven Lewis (The College at Brockport)
5:00
6:00
PM
Orientation Session
20091004T170000 20091004T180000
6:30
10:00
PM
Welcome Reception (Iron Horse Hotel, 500 West Florida Street)
Welcome ReceptionRanked by Conde Nast Traveler magazine as one of the "hottest" hotels in the world, you'll see the stunning results of the transformation of a 100-year-old mattress factory into a modern luxury boutique hotel. The Iron Horse is where business professionals and bikers alike gather to enjoy food, drinks, and the the views of Downtown Milwaukee and the neighboring Harley-Davidson Museum. The reception will include heavy hors d'oeuvres, networking, music, and a classic video game competition (dust off your mad PacMan skills). Even if you're tired from the day's travels, don't miss this event!Iron Horse Hotel, 500 West Florida Street20091004T18300020091004T220000

Monday, October 5

Applications and Standards Content Marketing, Management, and Professional Development Social Media Technical: Propeller Hats Required Corporate
7:30
8:30
AM
Breakfast (Crystal Ballroom)
20091005T07300020091005T083000
7:30
AM -
12:00
PM
Registration (4th Floor Registration Area)
20091005T07300020091005T120000
8:00
8:30
AM
Opening Comments (Crystal Ballroom)
20091005T08000020091005T083000
8:30
9:15
AM
ADA and Section 508: Best Practices for Web Accessibility for People with Disabilities
ADA and Section 508: Best Practices for Web Accessibility for People with Disabilities (APS11) The presentation will provide an overview of the approach to Web accessibility used by the University of Illinois. Our best practices (http://html.cita.uiuc.edu) are developed and maintained through a partnership of Web developers, people with disabilities, and disability access professionals. The approach is to build accessibility into our websites, rather than try to repair accessibility problems after they are already built. The Illinois Functional Accessibility Evaluator (http://fae.cita.illinois.edu) and Firefox Accessibility Extension (http://firefox.cita.illinois.edu) are free tools to help Web developers evaluate their HTML and test entire websites and provide both summary and detailed reports on the accessibility of the overall web site and individual pages. Walker Applications and Standards 20091005T083000 20091005T091500 Jon Gunderson (University of Illinois)
Using WordPress MU as a Web Content Management System
Using WordPress MU as a Web Content Management System (TNT11) The WVU Office of Information Technology has been working to implement WordPress Multiuser as a content management system. We are transitioning from a static HTML-driven website using Dreamweaver and Contribute. Currently we have about 18 content managers and have been looking for a more integrated approach to managing content, design, and user access. This session will describe why we chose to take a chance on WordPress MU over other Web content management systems and what we’ve learned from the process. Wright A Content 20091005T083000 20091005T091500 Sarah Barnes (West Virginia University), Alisha Myers (West Virginia University)
Succeeding in a World of Overwhelming Change
Succeeding in a World of Overwhelming Change (MMP11) Everything in college recruiting is changing. The forces of change range from the social Web to the need for authenticity to shifting student demographics to the increasing role of parents -- and now the economy. It's time for a revolution in how we recruit students. We have to use the communication tools that students prefer, which means becoming comfortable with social media. We have to be willing to give up some control of the message, which involves letting students see the real institution, blemishes and all. We have to see ourselves as sales people. This session will provide specific ideas as well as motivation for pursuing the changes necessary to succeed in an increasingly challenging environment. These ideas will include how to become more efficient, focus on core competencies, better manage outsourcing, retain key employees, redistribute budget dollars, enhance your leadership skills, and become more of a visionary. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091005T083000 20091005T091500 Brian Niles (TargetX)
Press Release 2.0 - News Releases in the Social Media Era
Press Release 2.0 - News Releases in the Social Media Era (SOC11) We have all done the same old press releases: insert headline, byline, body. What we will explore in this session is how to, as Emeril would say, "Kick it up a notch." We will talk about how to create a press release that will draw in users and address the changing needs of the end consumer and increasing ease of use for the media. It’s important for us to adjust our message format and delivery to respond to the needs of today’s Web-savvy audience. In the presentation we will explore the use of images, video, tagging, RSS, social bookmarking, Technorati, and other tools to create a release that will be more engaging and useful to a broader range of users. Wright B Social Media 20091005T083000 20091005T091500 Matt Herzberger (Florida International University)
HTTP 101 - Or, What Exactly IS Under the Hood?
HTTP 101 - Or, What Exactly IS Under the Hood? (TPR11) As Web professionals, every day we use software that implements the HTTP protocol. Usually, the details of HTTP are hidden from our view: browsers, servers, programmers, and system administrators make it so the average user thinks 'http' is simply a 4 letter symbol that goes at the beginning of a link. However, to a Web programmer or even Web designer in these days of client side XMLHTTPRequest scripting, knowledge of the details of how HTTP messages are constructed and interpreted can be useful. This session provides an introduction to the basics of HTTP including its concept of requests and responses, agents, error signaling and cache control, character sets, and media types. We'll cover techniques to inspect HTTP transmissions "on-the-wire" to help troubleshoot and debug your applications. We'll cover tips on how to speed up your website and applications by interpreting the contents of the communications between browsers and servers.. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091005T083000 20091005T091500 Jason Woodward (Cornell University)
Hannon Hill: Managing your Internet, Intranet, Extranet and Portal content
Hannon Hill: Managing your Internet, Intranet, Extranet and Portal content (COR11) Hannon Hill creates web marketing solutions that give people and organizations the freedom to manage their Internet, Intranet, Extranet and Portal content with ease. Our primary software solution, Cascade Server, is ideal for organizations in industries such as education, healthcare, technology, government, and publishing. Come to find out more. Oak Corporate 20091005T083000 20091005T091500
9:15
9:45
AM
Refreshment Break (Regency Ballroom)
20091005T09150020091005T094500
9:45
10:30
AM
Website Editing Using Ruby on Rails
Website Editing Using Ruby on Rails (APS12) Explore a simple and practical open source website editor dubbed RubyCMS. The driving goal in the development of RubyCMS was to allow editing to occur directly on the Web page itself rather than a separate and unfamiliar interface, and to address one of the most frustrating tasks users face when modifying a page on a website – placing, sizing, and captioning images in an article. See how Ruby on Rails and other open source products such as TinyMCE, ImageMagick, and Highslide simplify image uploading and captioning, and other common tasks such as composing image galleries, changing navigation, and creating forms. Walker Applications and Standards 20091005T094500 20091005T103000 Brian Jones (Luther College)
In Our Back Pocket: The Infrastructure That Protects Vassar from Out-of-Date Content
In Our Back Pocket: The Infrastructure That Protects Vassar from Out-of-Date Content (TNT12) At Vassar College, our Web development group took silos of Web content and created a well-organized content infrastructure that can sustain long-term growth in highly efficient ways. We now have at our fingertips a robust selection of our most actively updated, most heavily used content. News, articles from publications, and personal profiles can be aggregated, repurposed, contextualized, shared, and highlighted. Plus, we discovered that the core of this infrastructure relies on only a few pieces that were already part of the campus culture: the catalogue, faculty bios, and press releases, By keeping a few documents on campus up-to-date we can maintain the core of our Web content easily and focus on strategic growth. Wright A Content 20091005T094500 20091005T103000 Megg Brown (Vassar College)
Building a Strategic Plan
Building a Strategic Plan (MMP12) Using the four-step process that is the basis for public relations planning, this session will show you how to create a strategic plan. We will focus on creating a strategic communications plan, but this process can be used for most types of strategic planning. Creating a written document in this form will not only make you appear intelligent, but it may actually help you in getting your ideas accepted as you propose projects at your institution. Learning this planning process tool is a life changer for many professionals. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091005T094500 20091005T103000 Douglas Tschopp (Augustana College)
Nurturing Communities with Social Networking
Nurturing Communities with Social Networking (SOC12) Facebook and Twitter - they're just for fun and socializing, right? Not any more. Online social networks, when used intentionally and effectively, can be powerful community-nurturing tools for educational projects and events. And while there can be modest costs associated with some of these tools and services, much of it is free and simply requires you to invest time and patience to get tangible results. This session will focus on social networking best practices, case studies, and examples of impressive ROI, all of which will demonstrate that social networking use has matured beyond fun and socializing. Social networking tools can be an integral part of enhancing higher education communications, professional networking, media relations, and community-building. Wright B Social Media 20091005T094500 20091005T103000 Kristofer Layon (University of Minnesota)
jQuery: An Introduction
jQuery: An Introduction (TPR12) Let me introduce you to jQuery. jQuery makes JavaScript much easier, much more powerful, and much more reliable. We'll start with a basic introduction and move on to some simple examples, pros, cons, and favorite plugins (think extensions or applications). Then we'll open it up to the audience for some discussion. Are you a jQuery guru? Please join us and share your expertise and insight. Never heard of jQuery? Come and learn the basics. It's all about sharing the goodness that is jQuery. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091005T094500 20091005T103000 John Vieth (University of Wisconsin - Platteville)
Active Data Exchange: Web Calendaring at an Institution
Active Data Exchange: Web Calendaring at an Institution (COR12) Every organization struggles with the challenge of organizing, aligning and communicating dates and deadlines. David Lavigna, an education specialist with Active Data Exchange, will discuss how web calendaring streamlines this process, while engaging key constituents with interactive dynamic content. Oak Corporate 20091005T094500 20091005T103000
10:45
11:30
AM
Implementing Reason CMS with Small Teams and Small Budgets
Implementing Reason CMS with Small Teams and Small Budgets (APS13) Many people think that implementing a full-featured Web content management system (CMS) requires a huge team, deep pockets, or both. Reason, an open-source CMS developed for higher education, is one remedy for small budgets, small teams, and a growing need for content management. While commercial CMS acquisitions often involve an outside team and high initial and ongoing costs, Reason provides a lean alternative, with no upfront cost and a friendly developer community. Learn about the experiences of Carleton, Beloit, Luther, and Kalamazoo Colleges. Each school will discuss their Web teams, institutional needs, and CMS selection processes. Attendees will receive a LiveDVD with a functional Reason installation. Walker Applications and Standards 20091005T104500 20091005T113000 Nathan White (Carleton College), Charles Fulton (Kalamazoo College), Steve Smith (Luther College), Melissa Dix (Beloit College)
Increasing Web Site Usability (With or Without a Redesign)
Increasing Web Site Usability (With or Without a Redesign) (TNT13) Whether an institution has the ability to undertake a complete Web site redesign or not, editing the content found within the site can increase the site’s usability as well as create a positive user experience. We will look at best practices regarding content usability and how to apply it. Content revision may not solve all usability issues of a site, but it may be a good place to start for those institutions that are unable to address all three areas of usability: content, information architecture, and design. During our session, volunteers can have pages within their existing sites assessed. As a group, we can apply the information presented to discuss possible edits to increase usability. Wright A Content 20091005T104500 20091005T113000 Susan Ragland (Tarrant County College), David Wissore (Tarrant County College)
Creating an Online Brand: From Buy-in to Execution
Creating an Online Brand: From Buy-in to Execution (MMP13) Rolling out an online brand is more than the university marketing team sitting in a room deciding on colors and fonts. Branding starts with research and planning, and centers on institutional collaboration. Using the right communication tactics and involving the campus community in brand development builds the grass roots-level support that is critical during the brand roll-out. This session will outline a case study on a successful, cost-effective online brand roll-out, and is especially relevant for those in Web, communications and marketing roles. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091005T104500 20091005T113000 Jamie Ceman (University of Wisconsin Oshkosh), Jeanette DeDiemar (University of Wisconsin Oshkosh)
Talking to Your Boss About Twitter ...
Talking to Your Boss About Twitter ... (SOC13) ... and Facebook and YouTube, etc. Perhaps you've dabbled in social media personally and have some ideas on how your institution might participate. Or perhaps you've read about the impact of social sites and worry about being left behind. But how do you convince your boss that something called "Twitter" is a worthwhile investment of your time? This session will cover both strategies and specifics to help you demonstrate to your boss, your VP, or your board the value of social media. Wright B Social Media 20091005T104500 20091005T113000 Lori Packer (University of Rochester)
Writing Customized Web Applications with Django
Writing Customized Web Applications with Django (TPR13) Nazareth College has separated its Web needs into two basic parts: the content-managed and the custom application. Custom applications frequently start out as simple forms for passing information from site visitors to internal customers, but scope always creeps. Django is a high-level open-source Python framework that provides a foundation both for initial product development and for dealing with the changes that inevitably follow. During this session we will build a custom application in real-time to demonstrate how Django establishes a versatile, data-driven groundwork for any webapp, and how well it handles change. We'll do it carefully, calmly, cheaply, and we'll explain what we're doing while we do it. We'll be done with the app itself in 35 minutes or your pizza's free! (Just kidding about the pizza, but the app will be free, at least!) During the last 10 minutes we'll discuss how scope and requirements changes affect the product and open the room up for questions. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091005T104500 20091005T113000 Michael Smith (Nazareth College), Steven Smith (Nazareth College)
Innersync: Improve and simplify your web communications
Innersync: Improve and simplify your web communications (COR13) Innersync Studio, makers of Campusuite Improve and simplify your web communications, and get your users fired up in the process. Campusuite content management system eliminates outside resources for daily web site management, and gets your authors looking forward to keeping their content as fresh as ever. Easily manage all pages including news, blogs, faculty pages, events, calendars, photos, videos, FAQs, and digital assets using intuitive, easy-to-learn content tools. Oak Corporate 20091005T104500 20091005T113000
11:30
AM -
1:15
PM
Jared Spool General Session (Crystal Ballroom)

Keynote by Jared Spool, founder of User Interface Engineering, the largest usability research organization of its kind in the world. Learn more about the speaker.

20091005T11300020091005T131500
1:30
2:15
PM
Moodle
Moodle (APS14) Evolving since 1999, Moodle is a open-source learning management system. A competitor to WebCT, Moodle is flexible enough to allow for a full range of modes of teaching – allowing for more student interaction and input. It can be installed on a variety of platforms, and has the interoperability to work with other systems. Take a look at setting up a course in Moodle. Walker Applications and Standards 20091005T133000 20091005T141500 Sarah Schroeder (Texas A&M Universtiy)
Connecting Duke "Services"
Connecting Duke "Services" (TNT14) Duke University's campus, financial, and academic services are available on the Web through the different organizations that run those services. Users, however, don't know or care who "owns" a specific service, only how to obtain it. By offering up the services by service type, a major shift has occurred in how Web visitors locate the services they need. The two-year project led to the launch of over 20 different, yet connected, Services and Administration sites. These sites - with a consistent graphic look and feel, navigational placement, and Duke branding - run the gambit from Parking and Dining to IT and Security. This session will go over the specific challenges of bringing these groups together, developing a consistent informational tone, and actually building this many different sites (and wrangling content/content/content). Wright A Content 20091005T133000 20091005T141500 Ben Kimmel (Duke University)
Web Project Management
Web Project Management (MMP14) Web projects are especially fun to manage as they embody the true meaning of “Agile Extreme” development with a mix of people that have borderline behavioral disorders: Web designers, developers, clients, marketing people, writers, etc. To get things done properly, on time, and on budget requires adopting some form of project management. This session will offer up some strategies for managing Web projects in a higher ed environment. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091005T133000 20091005T141500 Jesse Rodgers (University of Waterloo)
Higher Ed Marketers: You Too Can YouTube
Higher Ed Marketers: You Too Can YouTube (SOC14) We made our foray into YouTube in early 2007, a time when YouTube was still largely experimenting with its higher education component. With the backing of the university president, we developed our channel with two broad goals in mind: to promote Texas Tech research and help boost recruitment. Our office broke away from the typical look of an academic website and gave the channel a cutting-edge look, inviting one of our design communication professors, who has an international cult following for his concert poster designs, to create our wallpapers and banners. Since launching the channel, we have partnered with students, faculty, alumni and university supporters to create content for our channel. This has resulted in some content that we don’t have the time to produce ourselves while also providing fresh sets of ideas and viewpoints. Wright B Social Media 20091005T133000 20091005T141500 Cory Chandler (Texas Tech University), Scott Irlbeck (Texas Tech University)
Dos Servicios Web, Por Favor
Dos Servicios Web, Por Favor (TPR14) Higher education has great enterprise services, but these services exist to students, faculty and staff as fragmented functionality. UW-Milwaukee has applied various Web services that fuse and leverage existing enterprise solutions. This presentation will use real-world examples to establish what problems Web services can solve and how. Demonstrations and code examples integrating Zimbra with ColdFusion and LDAP will be shown, but the concepts, methodology, and best practices are applicable to any language and any enterprise service with an API. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091005T133000 20091005T141500 Quinn Madson (University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee)
OmniUpdate: Enterprise Web CMS for Higher Education
OmniUpdate: Enterprise Web CMS for Higher Education (COR14) Come see a demonstration of OmniUpdate’s web content management system (CMS), OU Campus™. The first ten (10) attendees to this session will receive a free “Website Hero” tee shirt! In addition you’ll hear Rachel Reuben, Director of Web Communications & Strategic Projects at State University of New York at New Paltz, share how OU Campus is utilized on the New Paltz campus. Come see what makes OU Campus the choice for more colleges and universities than any other CMS, including: • Enterprise-class architecture — provides a secure and scalable environment, supporting everything from small departmental websites to multi-site enterprises • Decoupled and dynamic publishing models — built on open standards and leveraging the power of XML/XSL and XHTML, helps deliver dynamic, interactive websites • Extensibility through a modern framework and APIs — offers broad configurability of comprehensive tools and Web 2.0 technologies Oak Corporate 20091005T133000 20091005T141500
2:15
2:45
PM
Refreshment Break (Regency Ballroom)
20091005T14150020091005T144500
2:45
3:30
PM
World Caption Tool to the Rescue
World Caption Tool to the Rescue (APS15) Discover how a free captioning tool played a key role in helping deaf students access an online course that had over 25 videos. Learn what is involved in obtaining transcripts, captioning QuickTime compatible videos, and working with faculty who convert their classroom instruction to on-line courses. Hear about lessons learned and campus access policies that changed that resulted. For more information on World Caption and requirements go to: http://kb.wisc.edu/helpdesk/page.php?id=7096 Walker Applications and Standards 20091005T144500 20091005T153000 Alice Anderson (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
The ART of Content Management Training
The ART of Content Management Training (TNT15) Maintaining accurate, relevant, and timely (ART) content on your institution's website can be a challenge, especially when you have multiple content contributors with varying skills. At Widener University, we created six, two-hour professional development classes that provided the basics of HTML, Web graphics, writing for the Web, content management systems, and more. Campus participation included faculty, administrative, and office staff. Challenges included low to average IT and computer skills and a lack of general understanding about the Internet and the Web. Positive outcomes included a well-defined skill set and better understanding of the Internet/web that could be put to immediate or future use. Wright A Content 20091005T144500 20091005T153000 George Thompson (Widener University), Gail Farally-Semerad (Widener University)
Starting a Web Office from Scratch: Trials and Tales
Starting a Web Office from Scratch: Trials and Tales (MMP15) What does it take to start a Web office? We are here to tell you the good, the bad, and otherwise. Since the Web is such a hybrid field it can be challenging to find your perfect home. Most choose IT, marketing or strike out on their own. We’ll give you tips for partnerships, things to watch out for when starting a Web office, goals, getting buy-in, and developing policies and guidelines. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091005T144500 20091005T153000 Matt Herzberger (Florida International University), Nick DeNardis (Wayne State University)
The New Academics of Social Media Networking
The New Academics of Social Media Networking (SOC15) Stanford University's School of Humanities & Sciences recently completed a two-year Web development project, rolling out three new academic websites. These department sites help lay a foundation in our school for bringing together traditional university academics and the social Web. Our community services platform infuses all the usual departmental information with fresh dynamic content, self-managed personal profiles, blogs, groups, discussion boards, messaging, internal and external event calendaring, multimedia imagery, login/accounts, and much more. Powering the front-end is a specialized Web-based CMS application, developed in conjunction with our vendor partner, that aims to decentralize site management for the department staffs. Will online social collaboration and academics live in peace? Come see our new sites in action and catch a glimpse into the underlying story that's still being written, sometimes without a table of contents! Wright B Social Media 20091005T144500 20091005T153000 David Hart (Stanford University)
Cross-site Scripting: What Is It, and How Can You Protect Your Site from Becoming a Victim?
Cross-site Scripting: What Is It, and How Can You Protect Your Site from Becoming a Victim? (TPR15) Cross-site scripting (also referred to as XSS) is still the number one form of Web attack. From government websites to Google and Apple, it seems that no one is immune. In my presentation, we’ll explore what cross-site scripting is, how an attack occurs, and demonstrate a live exploit. We’ll then discuss why cross-site scripting can be damaging for a website, and we’ll look at methods one can use to prevent a cross-site scripting attack. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091005T144500 20091005T153000 Paul Gilzow (University of Missouri)
Terminal Four: enterprise level web content management system
Terminal Four: enterprise level web content management system (COR15) TERMINALFOUR Site Manager is our enterprise level web content management system - a web content management system built to be easy to use yet will work on numerous technical platforms and browsers. It delivers serious advantages beyond web content management publishing to a variety of communications channels including websites, Intranets, Extranets Portals, Mobile & Paper. Its easy-to-use web content management system, enterprise content integration, eForms and Self Service functions are scalable and offer bundles of extra functionality & web 2.0 modules to streamline your business. Oak Corporate 20091005T144500 20091005T153000
3:45
4:30
PM
Google Apps and Online Writing Lab
Google Apps and Online Writing Lab (APS16) The Tidewater Community College campus OWL (Online Writing Lab) offers real-time help 21 hours a day. In addition to walk-in learning assistance in the face-to-face Writing Center, students at both TCC and at Green Run High School have direct access to this support. Online help via the OWL Blackboard site combined with a ticket system developed through Google apps and Google Chat allows synchronous conversation about writing. The TCC OWL is available at times when students actually use services (after work) and in a medium they use (real-time chat) and is applicable for any discipline that employs writing. Walker Applications and Standards 20091005T154500 20091005T163000 Bill Harlow (Tidewater Community College)
Get Your Easy Button: Web and Marketing Working Together
Get Your Easy Button: Web and Marketing Working Together (TNT16) The decision has come from top administrators - we'd like to highlight specific academic programs through the use of integrated websites and print materials; we'd like to influence high school seniors and increase enrollment; and we're not sure what all of this means, but you have a month to figure it out. Such a challenge was given to Xavier's Web services, marketing, and enrollment teams. We will share the successes and challenges of three separate offices from three separate divisions coming together for a common project. What resulted was a coordinated marketing and communication effort that integrated Web, print, email, and video. As Xavier University anticipates its largest freshman class in history, we will share the details of a specific integrated marketing campaign that yielded measurable results: website visitors, actual visitors to campus, and increased enrollment in the targeted academic programs. Wright A Content 20091005T154500 20091005T163000 Kevin Lavelle (Xavier University), Maggie Ridder (Xavier University)
Communications & Web Services: BFF
Communications & Web Services: BFF (MMP16) Web Services and Communications are natural partners, even when they’re not related on the org chart. We’ll talk in detail about the various ways our groups are working together to advance university communications through Web technology. Some of our recent efforts include: educating campus communicators about how branding, design, writing, and video production are interlocking components of well-rounded communications efforts; integrating the traditional print/branding design process with the Web design/user interface process; collaborating on projects using online tools such as Basecamp and Jumpchart to effectively manage and share; teaming up to create a strategic plan for content on the main university website, and maintaining that content; working together to define the next generation of news dissemination for the university. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091005T154500 20091005T163000 Stacey Shintani (University of Chicago), John Eckroth (University of Chicago)
Join the Conversation: Social Media in Higher Education
Join the Conversation: Social Media in Higher Education (SOC16) TBA Wright B Social Media 20091005T154500 20091005T163000 Mark Greenfield (University at Buffalo)
Using XML to Create an Online Course Catalog
Using XML to Create an Online Course Catalog (TPR16) Stony Brook University will share the best practices and lessons learned from its recent project to create an online student course catalog. The automation project’s goal was to “go green” and reduce expenses related to the printed undergraduate bulletin — a 500-page publication that is almost always out of date by the time of distribution. Now, with an online version of the catalog maintained using the OmniUpdate Web content management system, the catalog can be updated and managed easily, and uses XML to take course information directly from the university's database. During this session, Stony Brook will review the reasons behind the project, give a technical overview, demonstrate the online application, and discuss the university’s next-step development plans. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091005T154500 20091005T163000 Michael Gasparino (Stony Brook University), Lance Merker (OmniUpdate)
Collegiate Web Solutions with Butler University
Collegiate Web Solutions with Butler University (COR16) Proprietary CMS Web solutions are already dead. We just don’t know it yet. Open-source content management systems have gained traction recently because of cost. But in this session you’ll learn the real reasons why you should be considering open source for your enterprise. Chris Dunn of Butler University and Doug Clark of Collegiate Web Solutions, both reformed anti-open source opponents, will share with you their epiphany about why open-source CMS solutions are our only hope in the "Data as Information Age." Oak Corporate 20091005T154500 20091005T163000
4:30
5:30
PM
Special Interest Groups
20091005T163000 20091005T173000
6:00
10:00
PM
HighEdWeb After Dark (Miller Time Pub, Hilton Milwaukee City Center)
HighEdWeb After DarkLooking for something to do with your free night? Stop downstairs from the hotel at the Miller Time Pub and watch the Green Bay Packers battle the Minnesota Vikings on Monday Night Football. Or, if watching Brent Favre (what? is it Brett? whatever.) in a purple jersey isn't your thing, play some pool and darts or just enjoy a social atmosphere and some networking with your colleagues.Miller Time Pub, Hilton Milwaukee City Center20091005T18000020091005T220000

Tuesday, October 6

Applications and Standards Content Marketing, Management, and Professional Development Social Media Technical: Propeller Hats Required Corporate
7:30
8:30
AM
Breakfast (Crystal Ballroom)
20091006T07300020091006T083000
7:30
AM -
3:00
PM
Registration (4th Floor Registration Area)
20091006T07300020091006T150000
8:30
9:15
AM
Conducting Usability Research with a Team of One
Conducting Usability Research with a Team of One (APS17) Conducting usability research can be challenging – even with multiple team members. But how do get the job done if your Web team consists of just one person? In 2008, the College of Arts and Sciences Web Team at the University at Buffalo was streamlined to one employee. Performing usability research along with regular web projects for 30+ departments and programs seemed nearly impossible. Learn how this web team of one managed to beat the odds. In this time of shrinking budgets, this session presents useful ideas and efficient techniques to perform usability research with one-person Web teams. Walker Applications and Standards 20091006T083000 20091006T091500 Christine Kowalski (University at Buffalo)
Inform, Interact, Inspire: Reimagining the Admissions Website
Inform, Interact, Inspire: Reimagining the Admissions Website (TNT17) Prospective students are one of the key audiences for your school's website, but they are also the hardest audience to understand. How do you engage a population that by definition is constantly changing? And how do you move beyond just dispensing information to involving and inspiring prospective students? Carleton College's Web team recently completed a full reimagining of our admissions site that grappled with these questions. This presentation will explore that process. We'll cover our research with prospects and what they did and didn't like about our website and those of our peer institutions; our concept development and testing process; the multiple levels on which we engaged our admissions staff to assist with content development; our wireframing and visual design process; the technical framework that allowed us to implement our new concept in about a month; and lots of geeky post-launch stats that suggest we're on the right track. Wright A Content 20091006T083000 20091006T091500 Mark Heiman (Carleton College)
Goal-Driven Web Strategy: Implementing Technology with an Eye on ROI
Goal-Driven Web Strategy: Implementing Technology with an Eye on ROI (MMP17) You've integrated technology into your marketing plan, but can you tell if it's working? Now more than ever, it's important to continually monitor your online marketing strategies to ensure they are optimized for success. This presentation will teach you how to develop your online marketing strategies in a way that allows you to measure their success, and we will walk through real world examples of calculating the return on investment of your online efforts. This presentation is about giving the audience practical, applicable information that they can take back to their institutions and start using immediately. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091006T083000 20091006T091500 Karlyn Morissette (DoJo Web Strategy)
Together Everyone Achieves More: A Team Approach to Student Support in Twitter
Together Everyone Achieves More: A Team Approach to Student Support in Twitter (SOC17) Twitter represents a new way for colleges and universities to connect with their students. Approaches to higher education Twitter accounts vary in their purpose and audience. New Mexico State University’s Division of Student Success (DSS) focuses on using Twitter as a support channel where students can find timely information, ask questions, and connect to campus resources. This approach led to the development of a Twitter team made up of both students and staff that can serve as a beneficial model for others. In practice, the NMSU Twitter team effort continues to evolve into a wider network with families, alumni, and prospective students. In this presentation, members of the team will share how the seemingly simple idea of using Twitter to support students required us to assemble and manage a team, develop a presence, institute and examine practices, integrate tools, and include administrators in the process. Wright B Social Media 20091006T083000 20091006T091500 Holly Rae Bemis-Schurtz (New Mexico State University), Phillip Johnson (New Mexico State University), Laura Grant (New Mexico State University)
A Model for Centralized Web Hosting and Development
A Model for Centralized Web Hosting and Development (TPR17) The Princeton University Office of Information Technology (OIT) provides centralized Web hosting and development services to the entire university community. Our model for providing this centralized service has been very successful and challenging at the same time. This talk will discuss the services we provide to the university community, the collaboration required within OIT to ensure the success of the service, the challenges we are facing, and some of the solutions we are developing to address those challenges. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091006T083000 20091006T091500 Joseph Karam (Princeton University), Mary Albert (Princeton University)
Day Software: A platform for Web 2.0
Day Software: A platform for Web 2.0 (COR17) Web Content Management, Digital Asset Management, and Social Collaboration form a platform for Web 2.0 that enables interactive marketers leverage the online channel as the most cost-effective marketing vehicle to engage customers and prospects to increase competitive advantage and drive revenue. Coupled with Day's world-class user experience to unleash marketing's creativity with a fun-to-use, drag-and-drop interface, Day Software enables marketing to meet key growth challenges in 2009. Oak Corporate 20091006T083000 20091006T091500
9:15
9:45
AM
Refreshment Break (Regency Ballroom)
20091006T09150020091006T094500
9:45
10:30
AM
Interactive Maps: Making Them Work for You
Interactive Maps: Making Them Work for You (APS18) Every university has maps - campus maps, construction maps, parking maps, special event or service maps. When everyone uses different maps, this creates consistency issues and duplication of time and effort. Not to mention that finding the right map can be frustrating for your visitors. This session will outline a work-flow and framework for succeeding in building an interactive map platform that works for you. Walker Applications and Standards 20091006T094500 20091006T103000 Joel Herron (University of Wisconsin-Whitewater)
Photoshop Secrets for Eye-Popping Images
Photoshop Secrets for Eye-Popping Images (TNT18) Beautiful photography is a powerful way to engage visitors on any website. Great photos are even more compelling in higher education; they give prospective students a sense of place and link alumni to their past. Unfortunately, many Web editors aren’t familiar with the tools that can transform ‘ho-hum’ images into eye-popping pictures. Using Adobe Photoshop and examples from the William & Mary website, this session will explore techniques for color correcting and enhancing photographs for the Web. With a special emphasis on Adobe’s Camera Raw, file compression and the magic of meta-data, this workshop is ideal for those with only a beginner’s understanding of Photoshop. Instead of delving into abstract technicalities, this session will be task-centric. We’ll take a common problem, such as “I want to intensify the sky and clouds in this photo” or “I’d like to lay text over this photo” and explore the tools and techniques that will accomplish that goal. Wright A Content 20091006T094500 20091006T103000 Joel Pattison (College of William & Mary)
Actionable Web Analytics for Higher Education
Actionable Web Analytics for Higher Education (MMP18) Web analytics has the reputation of only being useful in a commercial context, but there is much it can offer institutes of higher education. It can help optimize marketing efforts, help you measure and improve the usability of your site, and help you create a more engaging user experience. In this session we will cover analytics basics, present a few case studies of evidence-based decision making from analytics data, and then focus on Google Analytics as an analytics tool. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091006T094500 20091006T103000 Joshua Ellis (Penn State Outreach), Shelby Thayer (Penn State World Campus)
BFF <3: How Social Networking Made the Class of 2013
BFF <3: How Social Networking Made the Class of 2013 (SOC18) This admission cycle, we decided to implement a full-fledged social network as part of our prospective student portal, myIthaca. Not only were we amazed by the popularity of allowing accepted students to meet each other, but even more so that participation in the social network became the strongest instrument we had for predicting our incoming class. This presentation will talk about how we integrated an off-the-shelf social networking platform into our portal, how we gathered data for predictive modeling, and how we involved members of the campus community in the yield process. We will also look briefly at our plans for keeping the newly formed community intact by extending the social network into our portal for current faculty, staff, and students. Wright B Social Media 20091006T094500 20091006T103000 Benjamin Costello (Ithaca College)
Developing a News Microsite: WordPress at Texas A&M's Campus in the Middle East
Developing a News Microsite: WordPress at Texas A&M's Campus in the Middle East (TPR18) Texas A&M University at Qatar presents a case study that examines the process of developing a newsroom portal for the university's campus in the Middle East. This presentation and discussion looks at an assessment of organizational constraints of an all-Microsoft shop and limitations of the existing website; evaluation the campus IT climate and infrastructure to assess the most likely technological candidate; open-source evangelism and negotiation with IT for a WordPress platform; concerns for search-engine optimization that would allow international news media to "pull" instead of the university "pushing" through news releases; efforts to increase the multimedia richness of the university's Web presence with news-driven audio, video and photography; and the need for an externally hosted site that could double as an emergency communications portal in case of a diplomatic crisis affecting university operations in the Middle East. The need for Arabic-language content also is considered. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091006T094500 20091006T103000 Brady Creel (Texas A&M University at Qatar), Jamie Arrexi (Texas A&M University at Qatar), Court Sansom (Texas A&M University at Qatar)
Zimbra: open source server software for email and collaboration
Zimbra: open source server software for email and collaboration (COR18) Zimbra is an open source server software for email and collaboration - email, group calendar, contacts, instant messaging, file storage and web document management. The Zimbra email and calendar server is available for Linux, Mac OS X and virtualization platforms. Zimbra syncs to smartphones (iPhone, BlackBerry) and desktop clients like Outlook and Thunderbird. Zimbra also features archiving and discovery for compliance. Zimbra can be deployed on-premise or as a hosted email solution. Come find why Zimbra is the next-generation messaging and collaboration software. Oak Corporate 20091006T094500 20091006T103000
10:45
11:30
AM
Findability
Findability (APS19) Findability is the art of helping your audience find your website. Findability should be the goal of every member of your web development team from the marketing department to the web programmer. This session will cover findability techniques in all areas of web development including search engine optimization, Web standards, microformats and social networks. Walker Applications and Standards 20091006T104500 20091006T113000 Shelly Brown (Southwest Baptist University)
Get Started Making Online Videos
Get Started Making Online Videos (TNT19) As you may have heard, video is the new Web. But getting started making original videos can be daunting, especially if you feel as if you have no experience, few resources, and little time. This session will meet you where you are. It’s hardly “film school in a box,” but it will orient you to key steps as you start making Web video. If you suspect you ought to get into video but don’t know how to start, or if you're looking to supplement professionally produced marketing videos with homemade, "YouTube-style" videos, this session is for you. We will discuss the whole life cycle of a short video, from pre-production brainstorming to post-launch promotion. Wright A Content 20091006T104500 20091006T113000 Jonathan Boyd (North Park University)
Better Living through Minions: A Guide to Student Workers
Better Living through Minions: A Guide to Student Workers (MMP19) .eduGuru writer and Pittsburg State University Web marketing manager Michael Fienen will review survey statistics regarding Web office use of student workers from around the country. See if you're ahead of or behind the curve, and find out if there are better ways to use students besides as targets for unsuspecting USB missile launcher fire. As universities across the country are trying to cut costs, there are some effective uses of students that can save some money and take a little load off your shoulders, especially if you can't hire or fill empty full-time positions. We'll not only be looking at suggestions for effective uses of students, but also look at what campuses are doing with respect to how many students they use, where they use them, how much they pay them, and plenty more. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091006T104500 20091006T113000 Michael Fienen (Pittsburg State University)
The Kids Are Alright
The Kids Are Alright (SOC19) The millennial generation has arrived. Technology is just another part of their environment. They don't use the Web to view websites, they use it to communicate with friends. They completely distrust traditional marketing approaches and instead will turn to their friends for advice. Higher education's approach to the Web must evolve to meet new expectations and take advantage of new opportunities. This presentation will focus on the intersection of emerging technology and the millennial generation, and the impact on college campuses. It will include a review of the latest research and trends on millennials with an emphasis on their use of technology and the impact on recruitment and retention in higher education. Wright B Social Media 20091006T104500 20091006T113000 Mark Greenfield (University at Buffalo)
An Argument for Semantics—Why Developers Should Give a Hoot about OWL
An Argument for Semantics—Why Developers Should Give a Hoot about OWL (TPR19) In the push to integrate tagging and other forms of Web 2.0 technologies into applications, developers often overlook the value of adding semantics, or contextual meaning, directly to information that powers websites and applications. The addition of microformats to a site's coding can further the exchange of semantic information—such as contact information for people and events—but for the most part websites and applications are still composed of largely non-semantic text organized in large blocks of HTML. While everyone agrees that HTML isn't going away anytime soon, several Web standards have arisen over the last few years to help developers store, serve, and distribute information with ever-increasing levels of semantics and meaning. The current pinnacle of the Semantic Web pyramid is OWL—the W3C's Web Ontology Language. In this talk I will describe the basics of OWL and how it can be used to power the next generation of smart, data-enabled Web applications. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091006T104500 20091006T113000 Brian Panulla (Pennsylvania State University)
PaperThin: How American University Built the Ultimate Community Website
PaperThin: How American University Built the Ultimate Community Website (COR19) Learn how American University (AU) re-invented its Web presence to inspire passion for the University in a way that creates value for both the visitor—and AU. By leveraging a Web content management solution, AU created a community focused website that engages students making them AU's most authentic advocates. You’ll hear how AU gave students a voice by building strategic features such as AUPedia—a wiki-style informational tool that encourages users to contribute knowledge and experiences; how AU also added a Virtual Tour, student and faculty profiles, and videos and podcasts featuring lectures, speeches, and study abroad experiences; and how AU's new website inspires passion for the brand, compelling visitors to respond and reciprocate. Oak Corporate 20091006T104500 20091006T113000 Mindy Daigle (PaperThin)
11:30
AM -
1:15
PM
David Galper General Session (Crystal Ballroom)

Keynote by David Galper, founder of Ruckus Network, a digital entertainment service and social networking site for colleges and students. Learn more about the speaker.

20091006T11300020091006T131500
1:30
2:15
PM
Building Relationships: Tying Together Students and Their 2.0 Tools
Building Relationships: Tying Together Students and Their 2.0 Tools (APS20) The people directory on most college websites still works on the online phonebook model and hasn't changed much in ten years. Web 2.0 has given us folksonomies; it's time that we used them to better connect the students. This session will cover the Red Rover project, currently running on 15 college campuses. With Facebook Connect, OAuth, and Google Connect, students can attach their preferred social network to the school directory. This mashup creates a rich profile for increased searchability within the educational context. The combination of various online tools, including blogs, Twitter, and delicious, can create streams of student created content. Whole new worlds of live assessment open up when we allow the students to combine their preferred Web tools and networks with the school Web presence. See a visual walk through here: http://www.slideshare.net/kprentiss/wv-uexplore-presentation Walker Applications and Standards 20091006T133000 20091006T141500 Kevin Prentiss (Red Rover)
Pop Culture Communication: Microsites, Major Impact
Pop Culture Communication: Microsites, Major Impact (TNT20) As our mothers sign-up for Twitter accounts and listen to Pandora on their iPhones, we should take notice of the new prospects pop culture has made available for promoting our projects. Microsites provide unique opportunities to engage new audiences, extend our brands, and attract media attention. Because they can assume a life all their own, microsites are fun to develop, allowing for the ultimate in creative freedom. This presentation will explore several examples in which microsites were used as a key element in promoting strategic university initiatives. Practical techniques for developing creative new ideas, preparing for media coverage, and establishing metrics for impact will also be discussed. This session is intended for people with an interest in venturing away from typical development tasks. After all, how often do we get to take projects completely over the top? Wright A Content 20091006T133000 20091006T141500 Kyle Bowen (Purdue University)
This Is Not a Brand
This Is Not a Brand (MMP20) Does your institution often mistake its current marketing campaign for a brand? Does your institution’s leadership assume that the school colors are the brand, rather than just components of it? This session will focus on some different ways of thinking about and evaluating your institution’s brand, and will focus on some successful brands in higher education, including examples from larger institutions and smaller institutions, as well as some thoughts on how new technology such as social networking fits into branding. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091006T133000 20091006T141500 Doug Gapinski (mStoner Inc.), Patricia VandenBerg (Mount Holyoke)
The Domino Effect of a Viral Video
The Domino Effect of a Viral Video (SOC20) Reaching your audience today takes ingenuity and creativity. With audiences turning their attention to the Internet and away from TV, newspapers, and radio, universities need to get innovative in how they reach their audience. In this session we'll discuss how a promotional video to publicize a campus-wide festival “went viral.” Initially, the video was shared within the university and via Facebook. Before long, the video was posted on popular international design inspiration site NotCot.org and the blog of musician/record producer Mark Hoppus of Blink-182. Those two blog posts alone led to almost 30,000 views from around the world in a single day. More recently the video has been featured on Digg and Gizmodo.com. During the video’s first three weeks of release, the video received more than 120,000 unique views on video sharing sites such as YouTube and Vimeo. The video has become an example of how new media can be used to reach international audiences who help spread the word and pass it along, creating a powerful social impact. Wright B Social Media 20091006T133000 20091006T141500 Jared Lyon (Rochester Institute of Technology), Mark Marcello (Rochester Institute of Technology), Alexander Gartley (Rochester Institute of Technology)
Augmented Reality—Merging the Virtual World into Ours
Augmented Reality—Merging the Virtual World into Ours (TPR20) On November 4, 2008 the nation elected the 44th president. That evening on CNN, the network revealed their new “hologram” technology. Funny thing is that it is NOT a hologram… it was a demonstration of augmented reality. Learn how it works, see examples of how to utilize this technology for communication, and get samples to do your own experimenting. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091006T133000 20091006T141500 Daniel Frommelt (University of Wisconsin - Platteville)
Oracle: How the U. of Minnesota leverages Oracle Web Content Management for its new events calendar
Oracle: How the U. of Minnesota leverages Oracle Web Content Management for its new events calendar (COR20) Learn how the University of Minnesota redesigned its events calendar using Oracle's Universal Content Management product. Oracle's system powers the new calendar by giving University Relations full control of the design, branding, RSS feeds, and more while empowering contributors to add their own content, images, and attachments. Oak Corporate 20091006T133000 20091006T141500
2:15
2:45
PM
Refreshment Break (Regency Ballroom)
20091006T14150020091006T144500
2:45
3:30
PM
Millennials Rock the Web: Your Best Web-based Project Leaders are Your Students
Millennials Rock the Web: Your Best Web-based Project Leaders are Your Students (APS21) The University of Waterloo has the largest co-op program in the world. When we want to do something big on the Web, we hire a student, set the parameters, speak to them in their language, and are always astounded by the results. This presentation will cover strategies for getting the most out of your Millennials on the Web. We will look at case histories for some of our Web-based initiatives including our home-grown CMS, online forum, chats, Bayesian comment analysis, poster design, website usability, online video production, and virtual tour. We will also be sure to bring our fair share of the horror stories and jaw-dropping amazing adventures of our Millennials. Walker Applications and Standards 20091006T144500 20091006T153000 Jaymis Goertz (University of Waterloo)
Let’s Give ‘Em Somethin’ to Talk About (Facebook, Twitter, Blogs, YouTube, and More)
Let’s Give ‘Em Somethin’ to Talk About (Facebook, Twitter, Blogs, YouTube, and More) (TNT21) William & Mary launched a mascot search in February 2009. The communication plan integrates traditional print and web with social networking tools. The emphasis of the William & Mary mascot search communication plan is building online communities and using them as the primary means to inform and engage alumni, students, faculty, staff, and friends. The bottom line? We used the web to create an open and broadly inclusive process. The presentation will include these elements: • an outline of the communication plan • a description of how we are integrating social networking tools with traditional print and web • a show-and-tell of relevant web, Facebook, blog, Twitter, and YouTube sites • a summary of how SurveyMonkey was used for surveys • a discussion of our coordination with and support from decentralized communication units (development, alumni association, etc.) • some suggestions for keeping it fun, interesting, and interactive • evidence that alumni of all ages use the Web! The case study provided by this session is relevant for those who are developing web and communication strategies for colleges and universities. It is also relevant for anyone who will lead or participate in a campus-wide project or initiative. Wright A Content 20091006T144500 20091006T153000 Susan T. Evans (College of William & Mary)
Maybe the Purpose of Our Redesign is Only to Serve as a Warning to Others
Maybe the Purpose of Our Redesign is Only to Serve as a Warning to Others (MMP21) CSU, Chico is in the middle of redesigning our home page. In our case, this process has been as much about defining who we are as a university and discovering the unique voice of our campus as it has been about creating designs and wireframes. It has been a messy and occasionally frustrating process. In this session, I'll provide an overview of what we've learned in our redesign process: things that have worked amazingly well, as well as those that were doomed from the start. But through the entire process has run a thread about how, by bringing all these voices together, we have begun to bridge communication gaps that had never before been breached on campus. About how, faced with this large undertaking involving units and personnel from all across campus, staff and administrators have had to begin to think outside their silos. About how a new voice of the university is emerging. And about how it could all still end in tears. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091006T144500 20091006T153000 Anthony Dunn (CSU, Chico)
Listening to the Conversation Online
Listening to the Conversation Online (SOC21) Now more then ever it's important to listen to the conversation that is happening about you and your competitors online. Hearing what people have to say can help you with your social media strategy, website enhancements, and marketing initiatives. During this session I'll give you 10 reasons why you should listen, demonstrate different social media monitoring tools that you can use to listen to the conversation, and explore ways to measure the conversation Wright B Social Media 20091006T144500 20091006T153000 Holly Maust (BarkleyREI)
Show Me the Data: Usability-driven Web Design
Show Me the Data: Usability-driven Web Design (TPR21) When it comes to building or redesigning a website, everyone has an opinion. By conducting usability testing of your websites, you and others around you can temper those opinions and sometimes superheated emotions with data about how people actually use the site. By conducting Web usability of our own we were able to learn how potential site visitors interact with our site, witnessing first hand their successes and frustrations. Our usability testing took a number of forms, such as asking volunteers to perform tasks on our site while recording what we observed; distributing an online survey to our site visitor base; and asking volunteers to perform a card sort to organize site content into a limited number of meaningful categories. Not only did these strategies help us to better understand how visitors interacted with the site, but they also provided others in our organization the ability to make rational decisions. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091006T144500 20091006T153000 Jason Alley (Lafayette College), Kenneth Newquist (Lafayette College)
James Tower: connect with prospective students and enhance your online user experience
James Tower: connect with prospective students and enhance your online user experience (COR21) James Tower’s admissions and Web-based marketing solutions help institutions connect with prospective students and enhance your online user experience. • AdmissionsGenie, our personalized admissions Web site and email solution, helps you speak directly to students —providing information they need in a social networking experience you control. • Online application solutions allow you to securely capture undergrad, graduate and transfer applicants. • Web site design and consultation services improve the function and appearance of your Web site via a proven project process. • Content Management Solutions, from commercial partnerships to open source platforms, ensure you get the solution you need. • Blue Ox Mailbox is a robust and compliant email engagement platform with integrated forms, triggered response and many high-end features at a low-end cost. Additional marketing services include video production, virtual tours, CRM and Web hosting. We are your Higher Education marketing and technology experts.” Oak Corporate 20091006T144500 20091006T153000
3:30
5:00
PM
Poster Sessions
6:00
10:30
PM
Excursion (Milwaukee Ale House, 233 North Water Street)
ExcursionJoin us at the Milwaukee Ale House for food, drinks, live music, and brewery tours. Be sure to sample a custom beer brewed especially for HighEdWeb while you network with your colleagues in this historic brewery located along the Milwaukee River. For more information, visit http://www.ale-house.com/Milwaukee Ale House, 233 North Water Street20091006T18000020091006T223000

Wednesday, October 7

Applications and Standards Content Marketing, Management, and Professional Development Social Media Technical: Propeller Hats Required
7:30
8:30
AM
Breakfast (Crystal Ballroom)
20091007T07300020091007T083000
8:15
8:45
AM
Best of Track Awards (Crystal Ballroom)
20091007T08150020091007T084500
9:00
9:45
AM
Building Relationships: Tying Together Students and Their 2.0 Tools
Building Relationships: Tying Together Students and Their 2.0 Tools (APS20) The people directory on most college websites still works on the online phonebook model and hasn't changed much in ten years. Web 2.0 has given us folksonomies; it's time that we used them to better connect the students. This session will cover the Red Rover project, currently running on 15 college campuses. With Facebook Connect, OAuth, and Google Connect, students can attach their preferred social network to the school directory. This mashup creates a rich profile for increased searchability within the educational context. The combination of various online tools, including blogs, Twitter, and delicious, can create streams of student created content. Whole new worlds of live assessment open up when we allow the students to combine their preferred Web tools and networks with the school Web presence. See a visual walk through here: http://www.slideshare.net/kprentiss/wv-uexplore-presentation Walker Applications and Standards 20091007T090000 20091007T094500 Kevin Prentiss (Red Rover)
Increasing Web Site Usability (With or Without a Redesign)
Increasing Web Site Usability (With or Without a Redesign) (TNT13) Whether an institution has the ability to undertake a complete Web site redesign or not, editing the content found within the site can increase the site’s usability as well as create a positive user experience. We will look at best practices regarding content usability and how to apply it. Content revision may not solve all usability issues of a site, but it may be a good place to start for those institutions that are unable to address all three areas of usability: content, information architecture, and design. During our session, volunteers can have pages within their existing sites assessed. As a group, we can apply the information presented to discuss possible edits to increase usability. Wright A Content 20091007T090000 20091007T094500 Susan Ragland (Tarrant County College), David Wissore (Tarrant County College)
Maybe the Purpose of Our Redesign is Only to Serve as a Warning to Others
Maybe the Purpose of Our Redesign is Only to Serve as a Warning to Others (MMP21) CSU, Chico is in the middle of redesigning our home page. In our case, this process has been as much about defining who we are as a university and discovering the unique voice of our campus as it has been about creating designs and wireframes. It has been a messy and occasionally frustrating process. In this session, I'll provide an overview of what we've learned in our redesign process: things that have worked amazingly well, as well as those that were doomed from the start. But through the entire process has run a thread about how, by bringing all these voices together, we have begun to bridge communication gaps that had never before been breached on campus. About how, faced with this large undertaking involving units and personnel from all across campus, staff and administrators have had to begin to think outside their silos. About how a new voice of the university is emerging. And about how it could all still end in tears. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091007T090000 20091007T094500 Anthony Dunn (CSU, Chico)
Talking to Your Boss About Twitter ...
Talking to Your Boss About Twitter ... (SOC13) ... and Facebook and YouTube, etc. Perhaps you've dabbled in social media personally and have some ideas on how your institution might participate. Or perhaps you've read about the impact of social sites and worry about being left behind. But how do you convince your boss that something called "Twitter" is a worthwhile investment of your time? This session will cover both strategies and specifics to help you demonstrate to your boss, your VP, or your board the value of social media. Wright B Social Media 20091007T090000 20091007T094500 Lori Packer (University of Rochester)
Cross-site Scripting: What Is It, and How Can You Protect Your Site from Becoming a Victim?
Cross-site Scripting: What Is It, and How Can You Protect Your Site from Becoming a Victim? (TPR15) Cross-site scripting (also referred to as XSS) is still the number one form of Web attack. From government websites to Google and Apple, it seems that no one is immune. In my presentation, we’ll explore what cross-site scripting is, how an attack occurs, and demonstrate a live exploit. We’ll then discuss why cross-site scripting can be damaging for a website, and we’ll look at methods one can use to prevent a cross-site scripting attack. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091007T090000 20091007T094500 Paul Gilzow (University of Missouri)
9:45
10:15
AM
Refreshment Break (Wright Ballroom Foyer)
20091007T09450020091007T101500
10:15
11:00
AM
Building Relationships: Tying Together Students and Their 2.0 Tools
Building Relationships: Tying Together Students and Their 2.0 Tools (APS20) The people directory on most college websites still works on the online phonebook model and hasn't changed much in ten years. Web 2.0 has given us folksonomies; it's time that we used them to better connect the students. This session will cover the Red Rover project, currently running on 15 college campuses. With Facebook Connect, OAuth, and Google Connect, students can attach their preferred social network to the school directory. This mashup creates a rich profile for increased searchability within the educational context. The combination of various online tools, including blogs, Twitter, and delicious, can create streams of student created content. Whole new worlds of live assessment open up when we allow the students to combine their preferred Web tools and networks with the school Web presence. See a visual walk through here: http://www.slideshare.net/kprentiss/wv-uexplore-presentation Walker Applications and Standards 20091007T101500 20091007T110000 Kevin Prentiss (Red Rover)
Increasing Web Site Usability (With or Without a Redesign)
Increasing Web Site Usability (With or Without a Redesign) (TNT13) Whether an institution has the ability to undertake a complete Web site redesign or not, editing the content found within the site can increase the site’s usability as well as create a positive user experience. We will look at best practices regarding content usability and how to apply it. Content revision may not solve all usability issues of a site, but it may be a good place to start for those institutions that are unable to address all three areas of usability: content, information architecture, and design. During our session, volunteers can have pages within their existing sites assessed. As a group, we can apply the information presented to discuss possible edits to increase usability. Wright A Content 20091007T101500 20091007T110000 Susan Ragland (Tarrant County College), David Wissore (Tarrant County College)
Maybe the Purpose of Our Redesign is Only to Serve as a Warning to Others
Maybe the Purpose of Our Redesign is Only to Serve as a Warning to Others (MMP21) CSU, Chico is in the middle of redesigning our home page. In our case, this process has been as much about defining who we are as a university and discovering the unique voice of our campus as it has been about creating designs and wireframes. It has been a messy and occasionally frustrating process. In this session, I'll provide an overview of what we've learned in our redesign process: things that have worked amazingly well, as well as those that were doomed from the start. But through the entire process has run a thread about how, by bringing all these voices together, we have begun to bridge communication gaps that had never before been breached on campus. About how, faced with this large undertaking involving units and personnel from all across campus, staff and administrators have had to begin to think outside their silos. About how a new voice of the university is emerging. And about how it could all still end in tears. Wright C Marketing, Management, and Professional Development 20091007T101500 20091007T110000 Anthony Dunn (CSU, Chico)
Talking to Your Boss About Twitter ...
Talking to Your Boss About Twitter ... (SOC13) ... and Facebook and YouTube, etc. Perhaps you've dabbled in social media personally and have some ideas on how your institution might participate. Or perhaps you've read about the impact of social sites and worry about being left behind. But how do you convince your boss that something called "Twitter" is a worthwhile investment of your time? This session will cover both strategies and specifics to help you demonstrate to your boss, your VP, or your board the value of social media. Wright B Social Media 20091007T101500 20091007T110000 Lori Packer (University of Rochester)
Cross-site Scripting: What Is It, and How Can You Protect Your Site from Becoming a Victim?
Cross-site Scripting: What Is It, and How Can You Protect Your Site from Becoming a Victim? (TPR15) Cross-site scripting (also referred to as XSS) is still the number one form of Web attack. From government websites to Google and Apple, it seems that no one is immune. In my presentation, we’ll explore what cross-site scripting is, how an attack occurs, and demonstrate a live exploit. We’ll then discuss why cross-site scripting can be damaging for a website, and we’ll look at methods one can use to prevent a cross-site scripting attack. Mitchell Technical: Propeller Hats Required 20091007T101500 20091007T110000 Paul Gilzow (University of Missouri)
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Closing Remarks, Prestige Award, Door Prizes (Crystal Ballroom)
20091007T11150020091007T120000
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Lunch (Crystal Ballroom)
20091007T12000020091007T124500
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Workshops
Academic AIR
Academic AIR (WRK8) Adobe Integrated Runtime (AIR) brings exciting DHTML/AJAX and dynamic Flash applications to the desktop. Come to this session and hear from Romke and Nate, two energetic Flash platform developers that have created Flex and AIR apps, speak about AIR, Flex, and how it applies in an academic setting. This session will start with an overview of the AIR capabilities and speak to its potential for academic uses. It continues with demoing sample code for some of AIR's core feature set, and will touch on some advanced topics including mashups, tips on security, and what to watch out for when creating Javascript-based applications. Audience members are advised to have familiarity with Actionscript 3 and/or Flex MXML knowledge. Wright C Workshops 20091007T130000 20091007T163000 Nate Frank (Razorfish), Romke de Haan (Razorfish)
Creating Powerful Social Media through Convergence
Creating Powerful Social Media through Convergence (WRK9) Communities become powerful by coming together. They accomplish big things and transform the way we live and communicate. Social media tools don’t work well in isolation—they become more powerful by coming together with other social media. Convergence, the optimal state, broadens the reach of social media sites, services, and technologies and is the fundamental goal of an effective social media marketing strategy. It drives traffic, expands communication, and connects smaller communities to the larger community of the social Web. Even though it can reach a large audience, traditional media is limited in comparison. Colleges and universities need smaller communities and larger communities, the local and the global. Social media convergence marketing is a natural fit for institutions seeking to build communities of engagement. This presentation defines and then walks through the principals and practice of social media convergence marketing, from optimizing websites to deploying parallel social media community-building tools to achieve recruiting, marketing, and fundraising goals. Wright B Workshops 20091007T130000 20091007T163000 Fritz McDonald (Stamats, Inc.)
Designing for Content-Rich Sites
Designing for Content-Rich Sites (WRK10) Research has shown us how some sites, no matter what users are looking for, make it easy to always find the relevant information. Other sites, no matter how hard the users try, are too difficult and frustrating. In this workshop, Jared Spool will share the secret of designing sites rich in content, such that users are delighted and ready to return time after time. You'll learn how the content on your site emits "scent" and how to ensure users catch hold of it as they maneuver through your site's pages. At the end of this workshop, you'll know exactly what you need to do to greatly enhance the usability of your content-rich site. You’ll come away with the most up-to-the-minute research on how users actually navigate sites. Wright A Workshops 20091007T130000 20091007T163000 Jared Spool (User Interface Engineering)
Introduction to iPhone Development
Introduction to iPhone Development (WRK11) Designed for developers, this hands-on workshop will focus on building both Web and native applications for the iPhone OS platform. Learn the basics of Dashcode -- a powerful tool for building graphical user interfaces for iPhone Web apps using HTML and JavaScript -- and Xcode and Interface Builder -- tools for building native applications in Objective-C for the App Store. Attendees should have some familiarity with software development and are required to have signed up for the free iPhone Development program. See: http://developer.apple.com/iphone/program/start/register/. An Intel-based Macintosh with the latest version of the iPhone SDK / Xcode is required. See: http://www.apple.com/downloads/macosx/development_tools/iphonesdk.html We will have some equipment available on a first come first served basis. An iPhone / iPod Touch is not required as we will be using the iPhone simulator for our testing. Walker Workshops 20091007T130000 20091007T163000 Steve Hayman (Apple)
Introduction to PHP & Zend Framework
Introduction to PHP & Zend Framework (WRK12) This is an introduction to basic PHP 5 use with a focus on the power of dynamic pages in comparison to static HTML, including statement syntax, basic program logic statements, and data types. PHP will be used to create simple Web pages, and Zend Framework will be introduced and used to create forms. Pabst Workshops 20091007T130000 20091007T163000 C. Daniel Chase (Agile AppWorks LLC)
Moving from ASP or PHP to ASP.NET
Moving from ASP or PHP to ASP.NET (WRK13) Many of us have a love/hate relationship with server-side scripting languages. On one hand they are easy to learn and can get a basic job done quickly. On the other hand, concerns such as error checking, security, error handling, and tag soup also seem to come along with them. More and more it seems writing a maintainable and secure application in one of these languages is very challenging. Enter ASP.Net – designed to handle all of these challenges. For most Web developers, learning a new framework is daunting and besides, who has time? Yet the long-term payoffs can be well worth the effort. Objectives of the workshop include: building a basic data-driven Web application; separating a site into HTML templates, page layouts, and business logic; learning the basics of event-driven Web programming; preventing SQL injection and cross site scripting. Participants are expected to supply a Windows laptop with Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 (free download). MacArthur Workshops 20091007T130000 20091007T163000 Chad Killingsworth (Missouri State University)
WordPress University
WordPress University (WRK14) WordPress offers one of the easiest ways to give your users a full-featured site (not just a blog!) they can update on their own. This workshop goes from Installation 101 all the way to Applied Widget Theory and Special Topics in Theme Options. By the end of the day you'll understand how to install and maintain WordPress (on IIS or Apache), how to get the most out of its built-in features, and how to extend its CMS capabilities with themes and plugins. Basic knowledge of PHP is extremely helpful, but not required. Mitchell Workshops 20091007T130000 20091007T163000 Stephanie Leary (Texas A&M University)